US Soldier, Now 94, Reveals The Sketches He Made During The Carnage Of The Second World War

When Victor Alfred Lundy was supposed to be studying to become an architect at the age of 19, he rarely paid attention in the classes because he spent his time sketching. The New York-born student said that he always preferred to sketch than learn, and he had hoped to make this his career, but that it was cut short because of the start of the Second World War. Soon after he enlisted in the Army Special Training Programme, and in 1944 he joined the infantry, where he stayed until he was wounded later that year.

Victor took with him his sketchbook and pencil, to be precise they were 3”x5” pocketbooks, and the pencils were black Hardmuth lead drawing pencils. They became the means for Victor to record hundreds of events that took place while he was serving. He says that he found sketching as easy as thinking, and could draw very fast and accurately.

All of his sketches were done in black, although he did manage to colour a patch of blood with red. The sketches show daily events such as men at rest, or planes flying overhead, such as the one of an air raid over Germany early one morning. From fallen soldiers to his comrades playing games, Victor sketched them all. Some of his sketches capture the brutality of war and are very disturbing to look at. War weary men may be seen at rest, and buildings taken from everyday life fill the books.

We are given a look at a part of life which was not only brutal, but from which many men never returned home. Beautifully documented, they give us a glimpse in that time when life was very cruel. Each man longed to return home, but never could be sure that they would.

Architecture student Victor Alfred Lundy (left) was enlisted into the army aged 21. He continued to sketch his experiences on the World War Two battlefield between May and November 1944
One sketch expose the brutal realities of war by capturing a comrade lying dead in the grass. Breaking away from the black and white palette of his other sketches, Lundy used a smear of red to indicate the man's bloody head wound
One sketch expose the brutal realities of war by capturing a comrade lying dead in the grass. Breaking away from the black and white palette of his other sketches, Lundy used a smear of red to indicate the man’s bloody head wound
His illustrations were all done on pocketbooks that were 3 x 5 inches and Lundy used black Hardtmuth lead drawing pencils
His illustrations were all done on pocketbooks that were 3 x 5 inches and Lundy used black Hardtmuth lead drawing pencils
Many of his sketches are underpinned by a theme of wistful longing, captured particularly in one illustration entitled 'Home Sweet Home' - which depicts a soldier lounging in a hammock gazing up to the sky at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
Many of his sketches are underpinned by a theme of wistful longing, captured particularly in one illustration entitled ‘Home Sweet Home’ – which depicts a soldier lounging in a hammock gazing up to the sky at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
With planes flying overhead, this illustration shows an air raid over Germany seen on a morning hike
With planes flying overhead, this illustration shows an air raid over Germany seen on a morning hike
Recording everything from front line danger (right) to portraits of his battle-weary peers (left), poignant etches depict the achingly humane aspects of one of the bloodiest wars in history

The collection of sketches from his notebooks are very clearly and concisely done, with remarkable detail in every picture. Every day life is depicted, sometimes in what would appear as ‘normal’ occasions, such as the picture of a small house with clothes hanging on the line. Other pictures show the desperation and homesickness of men at war.

Victor, now aged 94, is a celebrated architect, having designed such buildings as the US Tax Court, the Sarasota Chamber of Commerce and the US Embassy in Sri Lanka. Victor has donated his eight sketchbooks, which all give us a look at what life was truly like during the Second World War.

A quaint church with a washing line strewn with clothes around it stands undisturbed by the carnage of war in Crasville in Normandy, north west France
A quaint church with a washing line strewn with clothes around it stands undisturbed by the carnage of war in Crasville in Normandy, north west France
Some scenes were more serene, like these ones depicting soldiers lying on their beds in between warfare
Lundy, now a noted 94-year-old architect, has donated his eight precious sketchbooks, unveiling an amazing testimony of what a soldier's life was truly like during the Second World War
Lundy, now a noted 94-year-old architect, has donated his eight precious sketchbooks, unveiling an amazing testimony of what a soldier’s life was truly like during the Second World War
Off-duty soldiers lounge around shooting craps to get cigarettes before pay day 
Off-duty soldiers lounge around shooting craps to get cigarettes before pay day
A soldier’s helmet laid on the ground (left) signifies Lundy’s fellow soldier, a man called Bill Shepard. His friend ‘Shep’ sits cross-legged as he stands guard in South Carolina (right)
Lundy found the time to seek out the beauty amid the carnage of the Second World War, stopping to sketch a half-built house with an exposed roof 
Lundy found the time to seek out the beauty amid the carnage of the Second World War, stopping to sketch a half-built house with an exposed roof
One cluttered sketch shows Lundy's 'view from my bunk'. Lundy admitted he sketched quickly and found that drawing was 'synonymous with thinking' 
One cluttered sketch shows Lundy’s ‘view from my bunk’. Lundy admitted he sketched quickly and found that drawing was ‘synonymous with thinking’
One drawing captured the Bourg de Lestre, a church and First World War monument In Lestre, Manche, while another shows soldiers exclaiming as they look through binoculars
After the war, he completed his architecture degree at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design
After the war, he completed his architecture degree at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design
In 1954, Lundy opened an architectural firm in Sarasota, Florida, and was named a Fellow by the American Institute of Architects in 1967
In 1954, Lundy opened an architectural firm in Sarasota, Florida, and was named a Fellow by the American Institute of Architects in 1967
The war veteran moved to Houston, Texas, in the 1970s and went on to design prolific buildings like the US Tax Court, the US Embassy in Sri Lanka and the Sarasota Chamber of Commerce (pictured, a depiction of the Atlantic Wall)
The war veteran moved to Houston, Texas, in the 1970s and went on to design prolific buildings like the US Tax Court, the US Embassy in Sri Lanka and the Sarasota Chamber of Commerce (pictured, a depiction of the Atlantic Wall)

Source: Daily Mail